Jack hamilton just around midnight

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jack hamilton just around midnight

Just Around Midnight: Rock and Roll and the Racial Imagination by Jack Hamilton

By the time Jimi Hendrix died in 1970, the idea of a black man playing lead guitar in a rock band seemed exotic. Yet a mere ten years earlier, Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley had stood among the most influential rock and roll performers. Why did rock and roll become white? Just around Midnight reveals the interplay of popular music and racial thought that was responsible for this shift within the music industry and in the minds of fans.

Rooted in rhythm-and-blues pioneered by black musicians, 1950s rock and roll was racially inclusive and attracted listeners and performers across the color line. In the 1960s, however, rock and roll gave way to rock: a new musical ideal regarded as more serious, more artistic--and the province of white musicians. Decoding the racial discourses that have distorted standard histories of rock music, Jack Hamilton underscores how ideas of authenticity have blinded us to rocks inextricably interracial artistic enterprise.

According to the standard storyline, the authentic white musician was guided by an individual creative vision, whereas black musicians were deemed authentic only when they stayed true to black tradition. Serious rock became white because only white musicians could be original without being accused of betraying their race. Juxtaposing Sam Cooke and Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin and Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and the Rolling Stones, and many others, Hamilton challenges the racial categories that oversimplified the sixties revolution and provides a deeper appreciation of the twists and turns that kept the music alive.
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The Airborne Toxic Event - Sometime Around Midnight (Majordomo Version)

Jack Hamilton challenges the racial categories that distort standard of songs and artists Jack Hamilton considers in Just around Midnight.
Jack Hamilton

Just Around Midnight review: Sex’n’drugs’n’race’n’rock’n’roll

Instead, Jack observes that black and white artists were in a broader musical dialog than has been previously acknowledged. His examination of musical influences across color lines reveals how musical authenticity was constructed differently according to race. For whites, musical practice depended on individual creative ingenuity, while black musicians were expected to express the collective black musical tradition. With a unique focus on how critical discourse shaped the racial identity of rock and roll, the book combines cultural history with music analysis, shining light on the ways critics reified the musical color line just as musicians were muddying the waters between racially identified musical styles. As a young white person who listened to and played a lot of music that was not made by white people, I sometimes attracted weird remarks and things like that. Because even at that age I knew enough about the history of rock and roll to think that was a very weird idea. But at the same time, it seemed totally reasonable to the people making it.

By the time Jimi Hendrix died in , the idea of a black man playing lead guitar in a rock band seemed exotic. Yet a mere ten years earlier, Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley had stood among the most influential rock and roll performers. Just around Midnight reveals the interplay of popular music and racial thought that was responsible for this shift within the music industry and in the minds of fans. Rooted in rhythm-and-blues pioneered by black musicians, s rock and roll was racially inclusive and attracted listeners and performers across the color line. In the s, however, rock and roll gave way to rock: a new musical ideal regarded as more serious, more artistic—and the province of white musicians. According to the standard storyline, the authentic white musician was guided by an individual creative vision, whereas black musicians were deemed authentic only when they stayed true to black tradition. Serious rock became white because only white musicians could be original without being accused of betraying their race.

Use the link below to share a full-text version of this article with your friends and colleagues. Learn more. Volume 51 , Issue 1. The full text of this article hosted at iucr. If you do not receive an email within 10 minutes, your email address may not be registered, and you may need to create a new Wiley Online Library account. If the address matches an existing account you will receive an email with instructions to retrieve your username. Read the full text.

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Ulrich Adelt, J ack H amilton., Why did rock and roll become white? What, you were expecting Elvis?

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White folk revivalists could hardly believe that the black musicians they worshipped were still alive. In chapter after chapter, Hamilton demonstrates the pervasiveness of the belief that only white men could play the role of the rockstar as heroic innovator. As Simmons notes, for the post-black rhetorical schema, race becomes either a prejudiced myth to be debunked or an administrative category loosed of all social grounds and thus capable of infinite modulations Either way, there is no room for historical interpretation. This makes it impossible to explain why purported nonsense evidently meant so much to so many diverse people, including those who, like Hendrix, claimed to have transcended it. It became a uniquely privileged way of being white. It seems to me that Hamilton is right to want to weave these two volumes together.

Elsewhere, cultural appropriation critics seem to advocate separatist states where only black people sing the blues or hip hop. And, presumably, only rednecks play classic rock. This seething cauldron of online discourse manages to be both right-on and right-wing, sanctimonious and censorious. If you berate a non-Rastafarian college kid for his dreadlocks, you must also prohibit Afrika Bambaataa from sampling Kraftwerk, Charley Pride from singing country, or Bad Brains from playing hardcore. Minstrelsy arguments are always messy. The real issue is power.

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