We need to talk about kevin explained

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We Need to Talk About Kevin - Did Kevin respect his Mum after all? Showing 1-50 of 52

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'We Need to Talk About Kevin' - So Much for Pathos

Implausible Psycho: “We Need to Talk About Kevin”

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. It only takes a minute to sign up. What is the purpose of this line? It feels like it is meant to have some broader significance to the story beyond its surface value. The scene can be seen here starting at about Ultimately it is left to the reader to decide.

After twenty-eight letters, Eva doesn't seem any closer to figuring out her son than she was when he was born. But she has decided to accept him, for better or for worse. Even though we know Kevin's crime from the beginning or from reading the back of the book , we don't know right away how he did it, and Eva lays out every gruesome detail so that she—and we—can be aghast at how terrible the crime is. We're not sure what is more shocking, the violence of the crime, or the diabolically perfect way Kevin carried it out. One thing Eva finally does that she hasn't been able to do in the years after Kevin's crime is to ask him flat-out why he did it. He thought he knew.

by Lionel Shriver

May 07, AM. I think We need to talk about Kevin is a great book for discussion, there are many points that could be pulled apart and looked at closely. My main question is regarding the relationship between Kevin and Eva. Did he respect and love her after all? He had the opportunity to make her part of the sick ending, and wiping ut his whole family - as she was present at breakfast that morning - so why did he let her leave?

It is written from the first person perspective of the teenage killer's mother, Eva Khatchadourian, and documents her attempt to come to terms with her son Kevin and the murders he committed, as told in a series of letters from Eva to her husband. The novel, Shriver's 7th, won the Orange Prize , a U. In the novel was adapted into a film. In the wake of a school massacre by Kevin, the year-old son of Franklin Plaskett and Eva Khatchadourian, Eva writes letters to Franklin. In these letters, she relates the history of her relationship with her husband, and the events of Kevin's life up to the killings, and her thoughts concerning their relationship. She also reveals events that she tried to keep secret, such as when she lashed out and broke Kevin's arm in a sudden fit of rage. She is also shown visiting Kevin in prison, where they appear to have an adversarial relationship.

Here, the family is not the gently glowing space where parents find the meaning in their lives, mothers do not always bond with their children, but teenagers—they kill other teenagers. We Need to Talk About Kevin. Courtesy of Oscilloscope Laboratories. What provokes discomfort is, rather, her very capacity to do so. Eva is persecuted—her property is covered in red paint, she is struck in the street—as if she, rather than her son, was really responsible for the atrocity. She has long suspected him to be either psychopathic or evil. Perhaps the principal difference between film and novel consists in the shift from the first-person perspective of the book, in which Eva tells her story in the form of letters to her husband.

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